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Syria: First Christmas in five years is celebrated in cathedral ruins of Aleppo


Christmas in Aleppo: Worshippers cram into cathedral that was almost destroyed by rocket fire for its first December 25 mass in five years… as Assad and his wife meet orphans at a Christian convent

  • Christians in Syria’s Aleppo took part in Christmas services after President al-Assad’s forces retook control
  • The Old City’s Saint Elias Cathedral, its roof collapsed following rocket fire, hosted its first mass in five years
  • 4,000 fighters recently left rebel-held areas in the ‘last stages’ of an evacuation as Syrian army retakes city
  • In Bartalla, near Mosul, Iraq, Christians had service at fire-scarred church after town was retaken from ISIS

Christians in Syria’s Aleppo took part in Christmas services after President Bashar al-Assad’s forces retook full control of the ruined former economic hub.

The Old City’s Saint Elias Cathedral, its roof collapsed under rocket fire, hosted its first Christmas mass in five years.

More than 4,000 fighters recently left rebel-held areas of Aleppo in the ‘last stages’ of an evacuation clearing the way for Syria’s army to retake the city.

A week into the rebel withdrawal from the east of Syria’s second city, the evacuation of fighters and civilians from the one-time opposition stronghold appeared to be reaching its final hours.

The loss of east Aleppo marks the biggest defeat for Syria’s rebellion in more than five years of civil war and a major victory for President Bashar al-Assad, who on Christmas Day was pictured meeting orphans at a convent.

The Old City's Saint Elias Cathedral, its roof collapsed under rocket fire, hosted its first Christmas mass in five years
A solitary Christmas light hangs above the rubble of the church's roof

The Old City’s Saint Elias Cathedral, its roof collapsed under rocket fire, hosted its first Christmas mass in five years

Christian clerics lead a mass at the Saint Elias Cathedral in Aleppo's Old City, which has been retaken by Syria's Army

Christian clerics lead a mass at the Saint Elias Cathedral in Aleppo’s Old City, which has been retaken by Syria’s Army

The loss of east Aleppo marks the biggest defeat for Syria's rebellion in more than five years of civil war and a major victory for President Bashar al-Assad, who on Christmas Day was pictured meeting orphans at a convent

The loss of east Aleppo marks the biggest defeat for Syria’s rebellion in more than five years of civil war and a major victory for President Bashar al-Assad, who on Christmas Day was pictured meeting orphans at a convent

Syrian President Bashar Assad, centre left, and his wife Asma, centre right, speak with christian orphans during their visit to Sednaya Convent

Syrian President Bashar Assad, centre left, and his wife Asma, centre right, speak with christian orphans during their visit to Sednaya Convent

More than 4,000 fighters recently left rebel-held areas of Aleppo in the 'last stages' of an evacuation clearing the way for Syria's army to retake the city, allowing Christians to attend masses

More than 4,000 fighters recently left rebel-held areas of Aleppo in the ‘last stages’ of an evacuation clearing the way for Syria’s army to retake the city, allowing Christians to attend masses.

And in Bartalla, near the Iraqi city of Mosul, Christians filled the pews of the fire-scarred Mar Shimoni church for the first service since the town was retaken from ISIS jihadists who had seized it in 2014.

The predominantly Christian towns of Bartella and Qaraqosh on the outskirts of Mosul were recently liberated as part of the Mosul offensive.

It comes after Pope Francis wished peace and hope for all those scarred by war and terrorism during his Christmas address.

Some 40,000 tourists and Romans calmly endured long security lines to enter St. Peter’s Square to see the pope on the central balcony of St. Peter’s Basilica, where he delivered the traditional Christmas message and blessing.

Francis spoke sorrowfully of the suffering caused by the Syrian war, especially in Aleppo, pressing the international community to help negotiate a solution.

A young boy dressed in a santa outfit waits for the start of Christmas Day mass at Mar Hanna church near Mosul, Iraq

A young boy dressed in a santa outfit waits for the start of Christmas Day mass at Mar Hanna church near Mosul, Iraq

A soldier from the Iraqi Army Special forces stands guard in front of a defaced Christian statue during the Christmas mass

A soldier from the Iraqi Army Special forces stands guard in front of a defaced Christian statue during the Christmas mass

Soldiers from the Iraqi Army Special Forces light candles during the Christmas mass at the Mar Shimoni Church in Bartella

Soldiers from the Iraqi Army Special Forces light candles during the Christmas mass at the Mar Shimoni Church in Bartella

Priests lead a Christmas Day mass at Mar Hanna church in Qaraqosh  in Mosul, Iraq. The predominantly Christian towns of Bartella and Qaraqosh on the outskirts of Mosul were recently liberated

Priests lead a Christmas Day mass at Mar Hanna church in Qaraqosh in Mosul, Iraq. The predominantly Christian towns of Bartella and Qaraqosh on the outskirts of Mosul were recently liberated

A member of the Iraqi Federal Police takes a selfie in front of U.S Army personnel while attending Christmas Day mass at Mar Hanna church

A member of the Iraqi Federal Police takes a selfie in front of U.S Army personnel while attending Christmas Day mass at Mar Hanna church

 

 

 

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