Muslims WorldWide

17,000 Muslim migrants sue the German government


Clearly it’s not good enough to be safe from the so called wars they claimed to have escaped from, get free money, free housing, and equality. Just punish the Germans by exploiting the legal system. The guest has become the pest. Just throw them all out, without any distinction.

Translated with bing and google into English with minor adjustments.

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Problem for German Justice

17,000 refugees complain for better status in Germany

17.000 Flüchtlinge klagen auf besseren Status in Deutschland

Sincw they cannot get their families [to immigrate] until years later, many Syrians in Germany file complaints in court. PHOTO: dpa, ht fdt rho

18 October 2016. 08:45
RP Online

Berlin. Since they are increasingly granted only a lower protection status, which permits their families to immigrate only after two years, more and more Syrians are filing suit in the administrative courts.

According to the “Süddeutsche Zeitung”, 17,000 refugees have complained in the first eight months of this year. The newspaper refers to the response of the Federal Government to the request of a left-deputy. In August alone, there were 6000, 15,000 of the total charges had been submitted by Syrians.

Almost all complaints are successful

Almost always, the judges had classified the status of refugees who had only been secured by subsidiary protection to a higher level of protection: 90 percent of complaints had been successful. Since autumn Syrians have obtained sweeping protection under the Geneva Convention (GRP), but since March 2016 it is reducing. 60 percent of Syrians still receive subsidiary protection, with which they may request after two years, to immigrate family members.

As the Rheinische post reported 9,745 asylum proceedings were filed in the administrative court in Düsseldorf by the end of September – 4,000 more cases than in the previous year.
(bur)

Source:

17.000 Flüchtlinge klagen auf besseren Status

 


 

Here’s an update on the story from British news:

More than 17,000 migrants file lawsuits in Germany aimed at getting their families to join them as courts struggle to cope

  • Thousands of asylum seekers living in Germany have filed lawsuits in court
  • They are aimed at getting migrants’ families to join them in the country 
  • Courts say they are struggling to cope with sheer volume of applications 

 

More than 17,000 asylum seekers in Germany have filed lawsuits against the government aimed at getting their families to join them leaving courts struggling to cope.

And now it is feared the legal action will open the floodgates to a new wave of mass immigration into the country.

It comes as many in Germany say the social fabric is already at breaking point in many places and the fear of violence with natives is a real danger.

More than 17,000 asylum seekers in Germany have filed lawsuits against the government aimed at getting their families to join them in the country. Pictured are migrants lining up at a temporary shelter in Giessen last year 

The migrants are seeking a change to their subsidiary protection status in Germany which can delay family reunification by two years.

This wave of litigation is rolling through the country’s administrative courts.

In the first eight months of this year over 17,000 cases were filed, 6,000 of them in August alone, with 15,000 of the claims by Syrians.

It is believed that judges are more likely to uphold their complaints in 90 per cent of cases, affording them ‘superior protection’ in accordance with the Geneva Convention on refugees.

The protection status has significant implications for refugees.

The majority of them who live with only subsidiary protection in Germany have to wait at least two years before applying for a spouse or children to join them.

The affected asylum seekers have only to claim persecution due to religion, belonging to an ethnic group or belonging to a particular political group to change their status.

And as a result, there are hundreds of lawyers willing to represent them in court.

In the first eight months of this year over 17,000 cases were filed, 6,000 of them in August alone, with 15,000 of the claims by Syrians. Pictured are migrants at a refugee centre in Frankfurt 

Combined with the thousands of rejected migrants fighting deportation orders, observers say the German justice system could be mired in costly refugee-related litigation for a decade to come.

Those opposed to increases in the numbers of refugees coming to Germany point to flashpoints where integration simply isn’t working.

In Chemnitz last month neo-Nazis hunted a group of immigrants through the streets of the city while this week in picturesque Garmisch-Partenkirchen in Bavaria the mayor appealed for help in handling 250 refugees whose behaviour is said to be out of control.

After an influx of almost 900,000 migrants last year, some Germans fear their country is being overrun by foreigners.

Chancellor Angela Merkel has attracted criticism for her migrant policy and her conservatives have lost some support to the anti-immigrant Alternative for Germany (AfD).

 

9 thoughts on “17,000 Muslim migrants sue the German government

    • They had one opportunity for political asylum; the very first country that they entered in their flight to offer it to them. Thereafter, they are opportunists on a shopping expedition with no legal standing. Their only right is to return, to their home country, or the very first country that they entered in their flight to offer asylum. Period.

      There is no such thing as a birthright to immigrate; not to Germany, Sweden, the UK, the USofA, or anywhere else.

      Like

  1. Pingback: 17,000 Muslim migrants sue the German government | zooforyou

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