Muslims WorldWide

UK: Muslims jailed in a £113m cyber bank scam operation


We’ve mentioned many times that Muslims run the worse criminal gangs in all of Europe. They rule prostitution rings, people smuggling, passport forgeries, livestock thefts, drug smuggling operations, migration fraud, weapons smuggling, terrorism, and all forms of financial fraud while they never contribute their weight to the economy or the tax coffers. It’s a parasitic addition to society of astronomical proportions. Put that into proportion with their small population in percentage to the total population and their contribution to crime is simply enormous. Another reason Muslim migrants should never be permitted into the West. It’s simply not financially viable.

Authorities should have a database where all luxury car registrations are red flagged for income verification. They would nab hundreds of thousands of these Muslim fraudsters. Muslims always drive around in luxury cars without any justification how the money was obtained for the purchase of such cars.

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UK’s biggest ever cyber scammers stole £113m by calling victims pretending to be from their BANK: Fraudsters used bin bags full of cash for shopping sprees, bought supercars and a Lahore mansion

  • Glasgow-based gang targeted small businesses in telephone fraud scam
  • They cleared out millions of pounds from their victims’ bank accounts
  • Head of gang spent money on luxury cars and mansion in Lahore
  • He has been jailed for 11 years and 14 others also face prison terms  

 

Feezan Hameed, also known as Feezan Choudhary, made millions from a scam in which money was taken from small firms

Feezan Hameed, also known as Feezan Choudhary, made millions from a scam in which money was taken from small firms.

Britain’s biggest cyber-fraudster grew so rich from a £113million scam that he flew his personal valets 8,000 miles across the world to polish his Porsches.

Feezan Hameed Choudhary, 25, described himself as ‘King’ and lived like one – jetting off around the globe to party with pop stars.

Dripping in gold jewellery, he posed as a hot-shot music producer and property developer and owned a fleet of flash cars including a Bentley, Rolls-Royce, Lamborghini and his two beloved Porsches.

Choudhary blew millions on a property portfolio in Pakistan, Dubai and Scotland, treated himself to £100,000 shopping trips at Harrods, bought £45,000 Rolex watches and enjoyed luxury holidays in the Middle East where he was pictured strolling the desert with a tiger.

But in reality the Burnley-born fraudster had fleeced over 750 British firms to fund his millionaire playboy lifestyle. Raking in £3million a month by cold-calling bank customers, he ruined hundreds of lives and put small businesses on the brink of bankruptcy – leaving one victim so distraught that she committed suicide.

Yesterday he was jailed for 11 years as the scale of the fraud by his 19-strong gang was uncovered for the first time.

Southwark Crown Court heard how Amy and Emma Daramola, two sisters who worked as Lloyds customer services assistants, were paid £250 for each bank statement they could hand over. Choudhary would use the information to trick business banking customers into thinking he was calling from their lender.

Hameed even posed with a tiger in a glamorous photo shoot thanks to the riches he obtained with the scam

Hameed even posed with a tiger in a glamorous photo shoot thanks to the riches he obtained with the scam

Feezan Hameed had this loud and expensive Lamborghini thanks to the hundreds of thousands he made with his partners in the scam

Feezan Hameed had this loud and expensive Lamborghini thanks to the hundreds of thousands he made with his partners in the scam

This picture shows the entire row of luxury cars that Hameed had, including (from left to right) a Bentley , a BMW and an Audi

This picture shows the entire row of luxury cars that Hameed had, including (from left to right) a Bentley , a BMW and an Audi

He poses with a specialist Mercedes 4x4 in another picture documenting his lavish lifestyle

He poses with a specialist Mercedes 4×4 in another picture documenting his lavish lifestyle

Hameed, 25, posted this picture of an expensive watch and his Lamborghini online

Hameed, 25, posted this picture of an expensive watch and his Lamborghini online

The fraudster, pictured, as he marries his bride at an incredibly lavish engagement party

The fraudster, pictured, as he marries his bride at an incredibly lavish engagement party

Confetti flies through the air as Choudhary enjoys his engagement, paid for with money he claims he earned as a music producer and property developer but was actually from the scam

Confetti flies through the air as Choudhary enjoys his engagement, paid for with money he claims he earned as a music producer and property developer but was actually from the scam.

Unwitting customers were told their accounts had been hacked and were duped into giving their internet banking passwords over the phone. The trick enabled the fraudster, nicknamed Fizzy, to steal £2.2million in minutes from one solicitors’ firm alone.

Using sophisticated software, the bank accounts were drained while his cohorts jammed the firm’s phone lines to stop them alerting their bank to the massive losses.The huge sums he made allowed Choudhary to live the high life, spending a fortune on Versace clothing.

Garments were bought for him by his ‘butler’ Abdul Iqbal, 23, who was filmed paying for designer jeans with bin bags of cash while his employer dictated a shopping list using the video-calling system Facetime.

The shameless conman hired suites at five-star Mayfair hotels to carry out the fraud. He also made calls to victims from his luxury holidays in Pakistan where he hung out with pop star Bilal Saeed, who he claimed to be producing a music video for.

Prosecutors believe that Choudhary took a 50 per cent cut of the proceeds which he blew on luxury villas and commercial properties in Pakistan, Dubai and Motherwell, near Glasgow.

He was so obsessive about his cars that he flew his personal team of valets from Scotland to Pakistan to look after his fleet of Porsche Cayennes at his villa in Lahore.

Scotland Yard believes at least 750 businesses were affected between January 2013 and October 2015, but there could be countless others. Choudhary targeted customers from Lloyds, Santander, Barclays and Royal Bank of Scotland.

Sisters Amy, right, and Emma, who were not jailed, seem to be enjoying a glamorous life in the picture believed to have been taken in 2013

Sisters Amy, right, and Emma, who were not jailed, seem to be enjoying a glamorous life in the picture believed to have been taken in 2013

Emma Daramola, 23, was given a two-year suspended sentence for conspiracy to commit fraud by abuse of position for her role as an insider at Lloyds
Her sister, Amy Daramola, 24, received the same sentence

Sisters Emma (left), 23, and Amy, 24, Daramola, both of Barking, east London both worked for Lloyds and were handed suspended sentences earlier this year.
Amy Daramola, 24, pictured in a glamorous swimsuit, was recruited by her security guard boyfriend who offered her £50 for each bank statement. She later demanded £250

Amy Daramola, 24, pictured in a glamorous swimsuit, was recruited by her security guard boyfriend who offered her £50 for each bank statement. She later demanded £250

Amy (pictured) even enlisted the help of her younger sister Emma, who wrote online in a blog that she was a slave to fashion and banking gave her the cash for clothing.

Amy (pictured) even enlisted the help of her younger sister Emma, who wrote online in a blog that she was a slave to fashion and banking gave her the cash for clothing.

One solicitors’ firm in Liverpool was said to have lost more than £500,000 while another law firm in Angelsey lost £670,000. A company in Gloucestershire was drained of more than £2million in less than two and a half hours.

Nearly £70million was laundered through bureaux de change in London and sent to Dubai and Pakistan. Only £47million has been recovered. Some 100 officers from 16 forces helped smash the fraud, with detectives using anti-terror techniques such as bugs and evidence from a supergrass former gang member. The fraudsters employed a technique called ‘vishing’ using details of company accounts provided by corrupted [Muslim] bank employees.


GETTING AWAY WITH IT AT THE TOUCH OF A BUTTON

The gang used the ‘vishing’ tactic after getting details of company accounts from bank staff.

Choudhary phoned businesses claiming to be from their bank, saying security on the accounts had been compromised

He got internet bank security details and passwords from employees and emptied their accounts in minutes, blocking phone lines with software to stop contact with the real bank

Stolen funds were moved to his bank account ‘at the touch of a button’ and then distributed across a number of accounts

The cash was withdrawn by ‘money mules’ and moved through transfer exchanges from London to Pakistan and elsewhere

The biggest raid saw £2.2million taken from a solicitor’s firm in minutes

Legitimate bank phone numbers provided by corrupt bank staff were used to confuse victims

The gang, said to be more sophisticated than most terrorist rings, used ‘burner’ mobile phones, ditched every 24 hours. 


Amy Daramola, 24, was recruited by her security guard boyfriend who offered her £50 for each bank statement. But she demanded £250 to hand over the documents and later enlisted the help of her 22-year-old sister Emma, who wrote online in a blog that she was a slave to fashion and banking gave her the cash for clothing.

Pictures on social media reveal the glamorous pair, from Barking in East London, partying on holiday and in nightclubs around Essex. In an earlier hearing, the sisters were handed suspended sentences after admitting conspiring to commit fraud.

Corrupt Lloyds account business adviser, Jones Opare-Addo, 58, from Putney, West London, was jailed for five years for leaking account details to the gang and setting up accounts to launder cash.

Choudhary used the details to convince businesses he was a genuine bank employee, telling them they had been hacked by ‘someone in Aberdeen’ called ‘King’.

Stolen funds were moved to his bank account ‘at the touch of a button’ and then distributed across a number of other accounts before the cash was withdrawn by ‘money mules’. When the racket was finally smashed, Choudhary fled to France where he was arrested using a false passport trying to board a plane to Pakistan on the night of the Paris terror attacks last November.

The ringleader, who was first convicted of fraud at 16, admitted conspiracy to defraud and money laundering in July but refused to name the bank insiders who helped him.

He claimed he was at risk of kidnap from rival criminal gangs who firebombed his Bentley outside his home in Glasgow after he was accused of having an affair with another criminal’s wife last year.

Images released by police shows a huge pile of cash uncovered during the investigation

Images released by police shows a huge pile of cash uncovered during the investigation

CCTV footage of the gang appears to show them paying at the counter with cash from a binbag

CCTV footage of the gang appears to show them paying at the counter with cash from a binbag

CCTV shows Hameed (on screen) shopping for designer jeans using the FaceTime app

CCTV shows Hameed (on screen) shopping for designer jeans using the FaceTime app.

Jailing him, Judge Peter Testar said the scam was allowing cash to flow like ‘coins from a fruit machine’. He added: ‘This was a complex, clever, persistent and pitiless fraud. The damage to the people running these businesses was potentially devastating. It would break the hearts of those who lost this money to see how it was frittered away on frivolous junk at Harrods.’


‘FRAUD GANG DESTROYED OUR TRUST IN OUR BANK’

A family of farmers who lost thousands to the fraud gang said the scam left them afraid to answer the phone.

A couple who run a farm in the Scottish Borders were conned out of more than £10,000 just weeks after they started using telephone and internet banking.

The farmer’s wife, who asked not to be named, told the Edinburgh Evening News: ‘I believed entirely that I was speaking to legitimate bank staff. They knew who we banked with and their local knowledge took us in completely.

‘We no longer trust people and are reluctant to speak on the phone. It’s been a very lonely experience and we feel bitter.’


He called the gang ‘clever, persistent and pitiless’ and described Choudhary as a ‘very strong personality’ who is ‘persuasive and authoritative to the point of bullying’.

Choudhary’s girlfriend Ayesha Nadeem, 25, was jailed for 20 weeks while his brother Nouman, 22 – the gang’s accountant – was given three-and-a-half years. They both admitted money laundering.

Detective Chief Inspector Andrew Gould, who led the investigation, said: ‘It is the biggest fraud of this kind we have seen in the country.

‘The level of trade craft they used was as high, if not higher than most terrorist networks.’

Nouman Chaudhary, 21, of Glasgow, was sentenced to three and a half years for conspiracy to money launder.

Judge Testar said Chaudhary ‘frittered money away on ephemeral junk’ at Harrods and was present when £48,000 was spent at the luxury department store, and also ‘threw himself fully into the lavish lifestyle’ including expensive hotels, cars and nightclubs. He travelled first class to Dubai and Pakistan.

Ayesha Nadeem (left) from Glasgow was sentenced to 20 weeks for money laundering on May 9
Jason Branche, who worked at Lloyds, from east London, got a suspended sentence for conspiracy to commit fraud by abuse of position

Ayesha Nadeem (left) from Glasgow was sentenced to 20 weeks for money laundering on May 9. Jason Branche, who worked at Lloyds, from east London, got a suspended sentence for conspiracy to commit fraud by abuse of position

Nouman Chaudhary was also jailed for taking part in the scam
Abdul Iqbal was also jailed for taking part in the scam

Nouman Chaudhary (left) and Abdul Iqbal (right) were also jailed for taking part in the scam

Syed Amish was jailed for money laundering
Mohammed Mehtab was jailed for money laundering

Syed Amish (left) and Mohammed Mehtab (right) were jailed for money laundering

Abdul Iqbal, 23, of Edinburgh, was sentenced to 21 months for conspiracy to money launder.

Hameed treated him as a butler or servant but he got a £3,500 watch from the scheme and was present at Harrods when £70,000 was spent.

He accepted that £110,000 went through his account but he ‘threw himself happily into the task and enjoyed the life that Fazeen Hameed brought him’, the judge said.

It would break the hearts of those who lost this money to see how it was fritted away on frivolous junk at Harrods.
– Judge Peter Testar

Syed Ali Amish, 24, of Luton, was sentenced to 32 months for conspiracy to launder money.

The judge said he played a ‘significant role’ in the gang including recruiting others to provide bank accounts and trying to arrange accounts himself.

Mohammed Mehtab, 35, of Watford, was given an eight-month suspended prison sentence after pleading guilty to conspiracy to launder money. He allowed more than £9,000 to go through his account.

Syed Haider, 31, of Slough, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to defraud and conspiracy to launder money and was sentenced to five years’ imprisonment.

Bilal Ahmed, 27, from Ilford, and Bushra Shabab, 30, from Slough, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to launder money. They were sentenced to three years and four months, and two years in prison respectively.

yed Haider was jailed for conspiracy to defraud and conspiracy to launder money

Bilal Ahmed  pleaded guilty to conspiracy to launder money

Syed Haider (left) was jailed for conspiracy to defraud and conspiracy to launder money and Bilal Ahmed (right) pleaded guilty to conspiracy to launder money

Bushra Shabab was given a two-year suspended
Ayesha Nadeem was jailed for 20 weeks at an earlier court date

Bushra Shabab (left) was given a two-year suspended sentence today for conspiracy to launder money and Ayesha Nadeem (right) was jailed for 20 weeks in May.

Mohammed Azhar, 38, from Slough also pleaded guilty to conspiracy to defraud and conspiracy to launder money and was sentenced to 32 months in prison.

Nine more people were sentenced at previous hearing, the details of which can now be published as all the defendent’s trials have concluded.

The Daramola sisters walked away with a suspended sentence and account business advisor at Lloyds, Jones Opare-Addo, 58, was also jailed for five years for leaking account details to the gang.

Naveen Devalapally from London was found guilty of conspiracy to defraud and conspiracy to launder money and on 9 August was sentenced to six-and-a-half years in prison.

Naresh Somu, 27, from Glasgow was found guilty of conspiracy to launder money and on 9 August was sentenced to 10 weeks in jail.

Ayesha Nadeem, from Glasgow pleaded guilty to money laundering and was sentenced to 20 weeks on 9 May 2016.

Sharmila Ravichandran, 22, Nikita Kadam, 24, and Harishakthimalayan Ponnusamy, 23, all from Cardiff, were all found guilty of money laundering and jailed on May 20. They were sentenced to eight, six and eleven months in jail respectively.

Hameed and seven others were sentenced at Southwark Crown Court after admitting charges

Hameed and seven others were sentenced at Southwark Crown Court after admitting charges.

3 thoughts on “UK: Muslims jailed in a £113m cyber bank scam operation

  1. Muslims are menace to the civilized society, any country where muslims have entered or born are having problem maybe not same but other different problems

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Published under FAIR USE of factual content citing US 17 U.S.C. § 107 fair use protection, Section 107 of the Copyright Act of 1976 and UK Section 30(1) of the 1988 Act.

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