Muslims WorldWide

The Black Death and Great Plague in 14th c. spread with Islamic slave raids on European shores


Notice how the article doesn’t mention even one word that the plague originated in Muslim occupied Middle East and correlates with hundreds of slave raids on Southern European shores during the time. These slaves got sold to the Middle East and beyond.

A couple of years ago we were on travels in Asia and read a translation of a ‘slave manual’ written by Muslims 600 years ago which described the cultural characteristic of the slaves they had captured around the world. In these writings the Europeans from each country, including Scandinavians, were all described in the manual by everything from their origin, features, height, complexion, hair color, mental, sexual and psychological characterstic – as was Turks (who appeared to have been favorite slave of the Arab slave traders including te Scandinavians), Indians, Africans, etc.Plague came from these slave-ships, possibly imported from the horrendous African slave raids perpetrated and kept in production by African kings who had converted to Islam and considered slavery their “god-given right”.

Muslims appear to have duped the Europeans by first establishing ‘friendly’ trade efforts through the ports of Venice purchasing goods from the Italian shores to assess the wealth of the regions, and which eventually lead them to destroy Venice, the biggest trade port in Europe at the time. The Muslims conduct relentless aggressive attacks, murder sprees, slave raids and booty raids on the Italian shores and from there spreading their jihad further and further into Europe. It is also during this time that jews suddenly made an appearance far away from home in odd places across Europe, and became persecuted from what appears to be the spreading of Muslim propaganda. Many of these foreign jews were infected with plague and it became a norm within Europe to associate the jews with this deadly disease. We believe these jews were slaves to Muslim owners and intentionally dumped onto European shores as a medieval biological warfare. Since the jews became known as a carrier of this infection, they became targeted and persecuted, many burned alive, tortured and killed and associated with the black death merely for being jewish.

The Y.pestis stain was spread by the M.pestis strain!

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‘One of the deadliest pathogens in human history’: A single strain of bacterium was behind the Black Death and Great Plague

  • Researchers have linked a single strain of Y.pestis to multiple outbreaks
  • Study looked at plague-infected bodies from Spain, Germany and Russia
  • Genetic analysis showed bacteria were from same branch of ‘family tree’ 
  • The findings suggest the bacterium spread from Europe and into Asia

By Ryan O’Hare for MailOnline
Published: 17:27, 8 June 2016 |

 

A single strain of bacterium is responsible for killing millions during the plagues of the 14th and 17th centuries, as well as more recent outbreaks of the disease, a study has found.

Scientists believe that Yersinia pestis – dubbed one of the deadliest pathogens in human history – which spread the dreaded Black Death throughout Europe.

They believe it arrived on the continent in the 14th century, where it decimated the population.

Using genetic analysis of remains from plague-infected sites in Europe, the team has found evidence the bacterium spread from Europe into Asia, where it caused the third great plague outbreak in the early 1900s.

Researchers believe a single strain of Y.pestis, the bacterium responsible for bubonic plague, was responsible for two major historical outbreaks of the disease as well as more recent outbreak in China and India, suggesting the bacterium spread to Asia from Europe. Pictured is a mass burial site in Ellwangen, Germany

Researchers believe a single strain of Y.pestis, the bacterium responsible for bubonic plague, was responsible for two major historical outbreaks of the disease as well as more recent outbreak in China and India, suggesting the bacterium spread to Asia from Europe. Pictured is a mass burial site in Ellwangen, Germany

HOW A SINGLE BACTERIUM KILLED MILLIONS AROUND THE WORLD

Researchers have linked a single strain of Y.pestis, the bacterium responsible for bubonic plague, to the two historical outbreaks for the first time.

But their analysis has also been able to link it to a more recent outbreak in China and India, suggesting the bacterium spread to Asia from Europe.

The study looked at bodies from three plague-infected sites: Two mass grave sites in Barcelona, Spain and Ellwangen, Germany; and a grave in Bolgar City, Russia.

DNA analysis of bacterial samples indicates the plague spread through the Mediterranean, passing through Barcelona, before surging northwards through Europe, reaching London and beyond in the 14th century.

Analysis of the bacterial family tree suggests it gave rise to strains found in Germany and France, and then spread through Russia and into China – persisting as the source of a major plague outbreak in Asia at the end of the 19th century.

Bubonic plague ravaged Europe during its middle history, with millions dying from the disease in two major outbreaks – with the Black Death alone wiping out more than one third of the European population in the 14th century.

After hundreds of years laying low, the disease returned to claim more lives in a second pandemic – the Great Plague of the 17th and 18th centuries.

In the latest paper, researchers have linked a single lineage of the Y.pestis bacterium to the two historical outbreaks for the first time. But their analysis has also been able to link it to a more recent outbreak in China and India, suggesting the bacterium spread to Asia from Europe.

‘Our study is the first to provide genetic support for plague’s travel from Europe into Asia after the Black Death, and it establishes a link between the Black Death in the mid-14th century and modern plague,’ explained Maria Spyrou of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, in Germany.

They focused on three sites of historical outbreak of plague, from two mass graves in Spain and Germany and a single grave in Germany.

Extracting DNA from the teeth of 178 bodies, the team was able to search for Y.pestis by analysing their DNA, finding evidence of infection in 32 people.

Scientists think that Yersinia pestis (pictured), the bacteria believed to be responsible for bubonic plague, hid in an unknown reservoir since the time of the Black Death in the 14th century, three centuries earlier

Scientists think that Yersinia pestis (pictured), the bacteria believed to be responsible for bubonic plague, hid in an unknown reservoir since the time of the Black Death in the 14th century, three centuries earlier

Genetic analysis of the bacterial 'family tree' of the samples suggests a single strain which arrived in Europe in the 14th century spread through the Mediterranean before surging northwards through Europe. The study suggests the same strain would have spread through Russia and into China ¿ persisting as the source of a major plague outbreak in Asia at the end of the 19th century

Genetic analysis of the bacterial ‘family tree’ of the samples suggests a single strain which arrived in Europe in the 14th century spread through the Mediterranean before surging northwards through Europe. The study suggests the same strain would have spread through Russia and into China – persisting as the source of a major plague outbreak in Asia at the end of the 19th century

Genetic material from three confirmed plague victims – one at each site – was then used to sequence the genome of the Y.pestis which killed them, and the samples comparing them to almost 150 bacteria from ancient and more modern outbreaks of the disease.

From this bacterial family tree it was clear that the bacteria responsible for the three major plague events were all from a single strain, say the researchers.

‘Our most significant finding revealed a link between the Black Death and modern plague,’ explained Professor Johannes Krause of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and senior author of the study.

DID FAMINE MAKE THINGS WORSE?

Life in the 14th century could not have been easy.

In addition to the deadly plague spreading like wildfire across Europe (see right), people also had to deal with widespread famine.

Historians at Harvard University think that a extended spell of cool, wet weather would have led to crop failures and prolonged food shortages.

The lack of food would have meant a more susceptible host, potentially maximising the impact of the disease.

Researchers used ice core samples to estimate temperatures in the early 1300s as well as historical records. Their findings suggest a much wider region of Northern Europe may have been affected than previously thought.

The group believe that by the time plague hit the shores of Europe, the population may have already been weakened from decades of food shortages.

‘Though several plague lineages exist in China today, only the lineage that caused the Black Death several centuries earlier left Southeast Asia in the late 19th century pandemic and rapidly achieved a near worldwide distribution.’

The findings add further weight to research published at the beginning of the year, which reported the same bacterium which was responsible for the death of large swathes of the European population during the Black Death

Scientists reported that Y.pestis may have been ‘living’ in rodents across Europe since the time of the Black Death in the 14th century.

The findings are published today in the journal Cell Host and Microbe.

DID THE BLACK DEATH START OUT AS A HARMLESS BUG?

The plague drastically culled the European population during the 14th and 17th centuries. The drawing above shows plague victims being taken away on a cart in London, which became a common site in the 14th century
The plague drastically culled the European population during the 14th and 17th centuries. The drawing above shows plague victims being taken away on a cart in London, which became a common site in the 14th century

A subtle genetic mutation may have transformed a harmless strain of bacteria into the Black Death that wiped out millions across medieval Europe.

Scientists say the addition of a single protein to Yersinia pestis, the bacteria responsible for the plague, may have been responsible for the devastating pandemic.

Researchers from Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine examined ancestral strains of Y.pestis in mice to understand how it gained the ability to infect lungs and cause the pneumonic version of the plague, which is more virulent than the bubonic version.

In the study, researchers found that older strains of the bacteria could colonise the lungs without causing the deadly disease.

A specific protein, called Pla, was absent in this particular strand. When researchers added the protein however, the bacteria gained the ability to cause the often fatal respiratory infection.

The study also suggests that similar genetic tweaks could produce new respiratory diseases that could be just as catastrophic.

Read more:

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Watch relentless muslim slave raids and occupation attempts on European shores where MILLIONS of white Europeans was raped, beheaded and enslaved and shipped off to the Middle East (which exoplains why some of the Arabs are so light complexioned today):

 

 

12 thoughts on “The Black Death and Great Plague in 14th c. spread with Islamic slave raids on European shores

  1. Question to the editors providing the supporting commentary
    “It is also during this time that jews suddenly made an appearance far away from home in odd places across Europe, and became persecuted from what appears to be the spreading of Muslim propaganda. Many of these foreign jews were infected with plague and it became a norm within Europe to associate the jews with this deadly disease”

    Question- Any chance some jews could have been slave traders- retailers- wholesalers etc? Salesmen for the Muslims? Some jews managed to survive and thrive inside Islam.

    Like

    • Many of the dhimmis were traders themselves, living under the Islamic law and paying jizya. So it is very likely. African kings themselves built the slave trade in collaboration with the Arabs and made all their wealth from it, and angrily defended theit entitlement to slavery every time Europeans wanted to end slavery.

      Like

  2. from what I have read, the Jews were targeted because a great percentage were NOT infected and the Jews, a traditional target of Christians, were persecuted as being devils and demons, as the laws said and as Jews were targeted since the Exile. The dietary laws as well as hygiene laws spared more Jews than not – get the facts straight. The rats on the ships from Asia were the vector, not “Jewish slaves”.

    I expect more from you guys.

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    • That’s the assumptions, the old versions of history. They don’t know all the “facts” from history. And plague, according to some historians, did not spread or come from rats.
      Where in history, for example, do you hear about the millions of Europeans taken into slavery by Muslims? Its never mentioned yet it indeed happened. Far more Europeans were taken into slavery and shipped to the Middle East than blacks taken from Africa and shipped to America. In many museums throughout Europe you find artwork of ‘diseased jews’ burned alive and tortured over the belief that they were curses and therefore diseased. It is perhaps too big of a coincidence that these jews were not local. What did they do there? And why is all of this in tandem with slave raid after slave raid on European shores?

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  3. RELATED ARTICLE; “Muslims have massacred over 669+ million non-Muslims since 622AD”
    ttps://themuslimissue.wordpress.com/2013/06/19/muslims-have-killed-over-590-million-non-muslims-since-the-birth-of-mohammed/

    Like

  4. Also research the dark, hooded death figure with the scythe reported spreading a “mist” around a town just before an outbreak of plague, another part of the story that we are never told and a very interesting one.

    Like

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